It’s All In Your Head: Supercharging Performance During Your First 100 Days with Jamie Sewell and Kevin Bailey

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The hosts:
Trinity Nguyen
Trinity Nguyen
Co-host
A profile photo of Christian Kletzl
Christian Kletzl
Co-host

"When you celebrate the win, it creates dopamine. And then that dopamine gets converted into noradrenaline, which is what gives you the effort to do the next thing.” – Kevin Bailey, Founder & CEO of Dreamfuel

When it comes to supercharging performance - mindset is everything. And during the first 100 days of a startup it can be the difference between anxiety and exhilaration.

Dreamfuel is a neuroscience-based coaching platform whose goal is to help organizations improve employee mental health. Not just as a well-being perk, but to boost revenue.

It’s aligning emotions, feeling, thoughts and actions to hack elite performance.

Jamie Sewell, VP of Growth, and Kevin Bailey, Founder and CEO, discuss how to guarantee success with visualization, how to understand your team’s mindsets, and how to optimize for mental strength and resilience.

Key Takeaways:

  • Why tracking mental performance is critical to revenue
  • How your mindset in the First 100 Days can set your team up for success
  • How to keep momentum after finding product-market fit
  • How to visualize outcomes when setting goals
  • Why learning the basic science of mental health and mindset is key

Things to listen for:

[07:24] Jamie: “We're still in our First 100 Days, we've got tight timelines and tight budgets and a small team. It really is coming down to running experiments, running them quickly, seeing what works and then continuing to innovate as we go.“

[15:58] Kevin: “When you close your eyes and you see yourself and your team closing that big deal, at the Christmas party with the CEO, signing on DocuSign and celebrating the win together and feeling it viscerally. That feeling runs the neurotransmitters that create the neuroplasticity in the brain to accept that event is gonna happen.”

[25:57] Kevin: “Do your best in believing in each other and do your best in believing in the mission. Look around for inspiration, wherever you can find it. Celebrate the small wins. Dopamine is the neuromodulator of motivation. So you gotta cultivate dopamine wherever you can find it. Look for the little microwins, celebrate it with your team.”

[27:79] Kevin: “When you celebrate the win, it creates dopamine. And then that dopamine gets converted into noradrenaline, which is what gives you the effort to do the next thing.”

Reference Links:

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Read Transcript

Trinity Nguyen:

Hey everyone, and welcome to another episode of The First 100 Days, a show for revenue practitioners by revenue practitioners, exploring how to build an aligned revenue engine, one practical tip at a time. I'm Trinity Nguyen.

Christian Kletzl:

And I'm Christian Kletzl. This season, we are talking about building revenue alignment, by asking high performing teams how they got it done.

Trinity Nguyen:

Hey everyone, welcome to another episode of The First 100 Days. This season we'll ask revenue leaders to share their stories around building alignment between sales, marketing, rev ops. Our guests today are Jamie Sewell, VP of growth at Dreamfuel, where she works closely with CEO and founder, Kevin Bailey. The two are working together to transition from being a professional coaching company, to offering a software that can actually help teams gain revenue alignment through neuroscience and mental performance. So as they're creating that, they're also finding alignment themselves in the first 100 days as a startup. Jamie and Kevin, welcome to the show.

Jamie Sewell:

Yeah, thanks for having us, excited to be here.

Kevin Bailey:

Thanks so much, Trinity. You phrased that very well, by the way.

Trinity Nguyen:

I'm glad, I'm glad, so I did it right, I was like, "I hope I do it right". So if you can take us back to beginning a little bit. So how did you decide to go from mindset coaching to software, SaaS?

Kevin Bailey:

We're not fully transitioning over to software. The software that we were building initially was conceived out of the fact that really there's no company that's built a great tool for measuring mental performance within teams. So obviously as you guys know, it's easier to work on things you can track and measure, if you're not tracking and measuring it, you're working on anecdotal evidence, stuff like that, it's a little tricky as a coach. So the software started to spin out of the idea that our mental performance coach as a performance psychologist, just wanted to take a daily pulse of the people that are coaching their mindsets.

Kevin Bailey:

And from there we built Intrinsic, which is the tracking software, and we're starting to see just the amazing data that comes out of that, and what you can do with it, which is almost limitless. I mean, to have a true snapshot of a team's mindset, when is their confidence faltering? When is discipline falling off? When is motivation peaking? When is their vitality suffering... Things like that is just a very powerful view into a team. So there's just a whole lot of goodness coming from it, but coaching is still fundamental to what we do, and we love coaching and the human part is so important, but the software is certainly giving us some cool things to consider and look at as we expand and grow the business.

Jamie Sewell:

I actually went through Dreamfuel's program last fall, and at the time Dreamfuel was starting to build the technology and formulate it. And that was one of the things that really stood out to me was going through a really comprehensive assessment of what my mindset was as a baseline. That was just so interesting to me to be like, "Whoa, what is my baseline mindset?". I'd never really thought about trying to measure and track it like that, because you're just used to your thoughts being habitual, right? They're your thoughts and they're with you all the time, and being able to really analyze and be thoughtful about where am I in this moment and then what are my mental patterns over time. So that was really interesting to me, even before I joined the team.

Christian Kletzl:

I'm very excited about this topic. I'm always talking about how athletes, they optimize their day, they track their progress every day and it's much, much easier to do this when you're an athlete than when you're in business. So I'm always thinking about how can you bring the mindset of, "I'm this athlete, I'm optimizing my nutrition, everything that I do, how I sleep and to be the best in the world", and we're trying to be the best in the world and the business that we're doing, but it's so much harder to track the progress every day.

Kevin Bailey:

Yeah, exactly. This stuff comes out of athletics, but most athletes are doing a physical game that requires the mind, we're doing a mental game, a hundred percent. I mean, there's not many physical elements to what we're doing other than good posture. So I would say it's a big category, it's just starting to emerge.

Trinity Nguyen:

As you Kevin, Jamie, talk about how Dreamfuel helps you, and what Dreamfuel is, I can see Christian's eyes just sparkle. I mean, that's his goal, to just become the elite business athlete.

Jamie Sewell:

We actually talk all the time about our clients being corporate athletes. So nailed it, Trinity, that's exactly what we're doing.

Trinity Nguyen:

Jamie, you mentioned... I didn't know that your relationship started because you were a client of Dreamfuel. How did you end up joining Dreamfuel?

Jamie Sewell:

So I am a bit of a neuroscience and mindset junkie already, and when the pandemic started, I had my own come to Jesus moment... I was working in technology and was just like, "What am I doing with my life? I really enjoy my work, but the meaning doesn't feel like it's totally there". And personally, I had been really exploring a lot of the things that Dreamfuel coaches on, and so for myself, I had this internal alignment and was like, "No, I'm very passionate about coaching and neuroscience and actually bringing those tools into the workplace". Because I feel like people spend so much time working, and so it's a big source of both fulfillment and stress, right?

Jamie Sewell:

And so for me, there's so many amazing tools at our fingertips that just aren't being brought into the workplace. And so I was having those "Aha" moments, and signed up for Dreamfuel's program last fall, and I was in a sales role. So it was just a perfect fit for me to continue to explore things that I already loved and was really passionate about, and integrate that into my own career.

Trinity Nguyen:

That's awesome. We could segway over to the business side, but I noticed something. So Jamie, your background was in sales and now you are running growth, which I'm guessing is marketing...

Jamie Sewell:

Right now, it's mostly... It's a blend, depends on the day, it depends on the week.

Trinity Nguyen:

Well, we wear all hats at startups, but I think... And then Kevin, I noticed your background, you were CMO at some points, right? You were in marketing and now as a founder, essentially doing sales.

Kevin Bailey:

Yeah, I founded an agency, technology enabled agency, back in the day. So I've worn the CMO hat before, it was a while ago, some things changed, some things stay the same. In this run, I'm the founder, mainly focused on innovation and the amount of concepts that you have to wrap your head around to be good in this industry is sometimes a little bit mind numbing. So I spend most of my free time reading up on neuroscience and stuff like that, rather than marketing.

Trinity Nguyen:

To segway over to the business, so as you guys going through the transition right now, setting up the startup, the software company, tell me a little bit more about the different challenges that you're seeing, and how you're essentially building the go-to-market engine together. What's going on?

Kevin Bailey:

It's lots of experimentation, lean startup style, where Jamie and I are trying to figure out what works and what doesn't.

Jamie Sewell:

We're still in our first 100 days, we've got tight timelines and tight budgets and a small team. And so, like Kevin said, it really is coming down to running experiments, running them quickly, seeing what works and then just continuing to innovate as we go.

Kevin Bailey:

We're bringing mindset tools to bear obviously, during the first 100 days, we did a little visualization of finding a growth hack and how that'll feel when we find that one thing that's going to help us really hit that tipping point. So we've been putting our own tools to work on this, but yeah, it's a lot of uncertainty as you're trying to really find... I mean, people love our service, we have very happy clients, but they've all come through referral. So now that we're going out outside of our network and trying to cultivate new business, that's where the experimentation is, so we have product market fit, but we don't have yet... I don't know the terminology you use on this, but we don't have an outside market. People love the product, but we have to learn how to explain it properly and sell it properly to people who've never heard of us, and that's the journey.

Christian Kletzl:

Is that the transition now for you... What is the difference between in a sense previously where you're the coaching company versus now, I think it's pretty much a SaaS on top a little bit. So this means that a lot of the product, or even some of the offerings that you have might even stay the same or packaged into a tool, but what is different? What is the same?

Kevin Bailey:

Dreamfuel came out of my own experiences as a founder, back at my first technology enabled agency, and just became obsessed with this and started getting my masters in neuroscience and diving in, and then started working for basically friends of mine who are founders of high growth technology companies, back in about 2016. And I started working with sales teams and executive teams, and two of those companies have now become unicorns, Greenlight Guru and LinkSquares. We have another one that's right about there, and then we have a few others in the wings, and mindset basically is the practice of teaching people how to show up consistently, no matter what environmental factors are influencing them. So, an elite performer is just consistent every day. Well, if your sales team's consistent, you're probably going to raise conversion rates, rather than... High performer's up and down, an elite performer is just consistent.

Kevin Bailey:

So, that allowed us to get a lot of referrals, we would be able to show 44% lifting conversion rates, I mean Greenlight's a good example of that. Just mindset alone, they had a 44% increase in conversion rates, two quarters versus two quarters without us. So that allowed us to get out and work with other companies, and we've just seen a lot of success in that, and then now with the tracking software, we have just offered this standalone. Now there is coaching, but it's basically the software paired up with video and a playbook. Granted we're still selling live coaching in group sessions as well as individual, and that's a very important thing that we do.

Kevin Bailey:

But yeah, we're starting to sell a little bit of the standalone, and the big transition like I said before is, we've always sold within our little network. People who know who we are, they're able to reach out to their buddy and say, "Hey, is Dreamfuel working out for you?", "Yeah, it boosts conversion rate", "Great. All right, just double checking". And now it's this whole group of people who've never heard of it, who don't even understand the category, who don't understand that mental performance is something that could truly impact the bottom line, trying to get that message out there, and a little more sophisticated with software, for sure.

Trinity Nguyen:

Do you see that... As you describe it, I'm like, "Yes, our team would love to see something like this as well", especially in the remote world. So do you see any difference in terms of your clients and what they're facing in terms of mental performance before the pandemic, before the whole work from home, versus now, and any tips for revenue folks out there, sales and marketing too.

Kevin Bailey:

COVID was... As hard as it's been for a lot of people, it certainly wasn't for Dreamfuel, it really turned the knob up for us. And even whatever we're going into right now, little economic blip, also a positive thing for us, anything that causes stressors. So working in an environment that's remote is definitely... You're going to feel a little bit disconnected from your staff, so knowing how their mindset's doing, I was just talking to a high growth CEO yesterday and he was like, "Yeah, it's a whole different world. People are second guessing each other, projecting, thinking things that aren't true about each other, stuff that wasn't happening in the office, and because we're not around each other, we just are just guessing about each other".

Kevin Bailey:

So it was easy to say, "Well, what if you could actually tangibly look at people's mindsets and understand what's influencing it and what's not", but it is a new normal. And when you're with somebody physically, we mirror each other, we have mirror neurons. You can sense generally how they're doing, you can't pick up as many non verbals over zoom like this, it's just tough to tell. So yeah, it's been a really good thing for us. Unfortunate thing for society, but maybe it's helping us all level up a little bit in our mental health.

Jamie Sewell:

Visualizations have always been a really popular tool to bring teams together. So Christian, you mentioned athletes earlier, right? Athletes are famous for using visualizations before big games and things like that. And I think the challenge is, that Kevin talked about with... We're not able to pick up on all those social cues, that's for sure happening. But I think the visualizations are very powerful for our teams because there is that subliminal connection that I think everybody can slow down and really check in, and at least imagine, they're all after the same thing, and I do think that has a very unifying effect on teams.

Kevin Bailey:

At the inception of a quarter, beginning of every quarter, with any team that we work with, we always visualize the end of the quarter, hitting their goals, how it's going to feel, what's going to change, what behaviors they want to change, how they want to work together, collaborate, coordinate, et cetera. So that's something that we do that does allow for a shared consciousness among the teams we work with, it's fun.

Trinity Nguyen:

And I think, not just individual performance, you mentioned teams, but not just the sales team. We talk a lot about revenue alignment, but all of these things, the neuroscience, the mental performance, ability to relate and trust somebody else in the same boat as you, helps with revenue alignment too, marketing and sales. If you don't see each other and don't have that trust that you guys just talked about, things could fall apart, and distrust and things not great for company performance.

Kevin Bailey:

No doubt about it.

Christian Kletzl:

Are you trying to convince Kevin of his product.

Kevin Bailey:

Obviously Jamie and I are working together to find alignment on this in this first 100 days, even as practitioners of this stuff, we're having to use the tools. I'm a founder who built something pretty much by myself in the beginning, and then started to bring teams on. Every other company I've had, people from jump street that I've co-founded with. So it's been an interesting little quest to expand this thing out and try and make this thing about more than just my thoughts.

Christian Kletzl:

I think the way I think about this is that, we have connections everywhere, right? Within the team it's with colleagues, it's also in sales, I'm always thinking of sales, we build a connection also with a customer. And as you say, it's harder over Zoom, it's hard over video. So certainly something I'm always wondering how can that be improved. But if you're thinking about any of the relationships internally or externally, you talked about visualizing the goal or the quota achievement at the end of the quarter, is there something where you say this is something revenue leaders can do immediately, to get a little bit better here? What are some quick tips from the pros?

Kevin Bailey:

Visualization is incredible. If you're not doing it, either talk to us or do some Google searches, it's such a powerful way to help your mind align with the outcomes you're going after. Everybody who does it becomes a massive fan, as long as they do it properly. There's a few things to know which is, you have to be able to work yourself up into an emotive state, emotion is what creates neuroplasticity. The whole point of visualization is you get the subconscious mind which controls about 95% of your thoughts to back up the behaviors you want to do. So you might know the behaviors of success, but if you're not pulling them off properly, it's not going to work. Sometimes people won't even do the behaviors, so you got to get the subconscious mind aligned. So subconscious mind cannot tell the difference between what is real, believe it or not, what is real and what you imagine really well.

Kevin Bailey:

So when you close your eyes and you see yourself and your team closing that big deal, at the Christmas party, with the CEO, signing on DocuSign and celebrating the win together and feeling it viscerally, that feeling runs the neurotransmitters that create the neuroplasticity in the brain to accept that that event is going to happen. And one of the best stories I have about that... I mean, this goes back to sports, but Anna [inaudible 00:16:26], who's a performance coach at our company. She was a former pro athlete and her dad was a neuropsychologist and taught her all this stuff. She ran the 10 minute two mile in high school, which at the time was unheard of, and she kept visualizing it and visualizing it and visualizing it, running that, finishing that race, 10 minutes and two miles, two five minute miles back to back.

Kevin Bailey:

And she had a reporter come up before she ran the race. And the reporter was like, "Hey Anna, I know you're strong, but people don't do this at your age, probably not going to happen", did one of those things with her. And Anna always responds that she was absolutely shocked that he said it, because her subconscious mind thought the race was already over and she won, and she did it. So that kind of confidence, that closes deals. When you go into a meeting thinking there's no question that this prospect's getting on board, visualization before big meetings, stuff like that... Super powerful, because you're putting off that confidence by our senses, no fear, no uncertainty in you, which can sometimes be misconstrued as maybe insecurity in your product or something like that, they get nothing but pure confidence.

Kevin Bailey:

That was the big thing I did at my first company when at a certain point I had to go in and sell, and we were pretty large at the time. And I just used a form of visualization we call rehearsal journaling before every meeting, my close rate about doubled, and I set a sales record. And just every meeting, I would just visualize at the end of the meeting being like, "All right, we're in, send us the agreement", and I would just get really pumped about it. And then these were big companies like Intel and Ashley Furniture and stuff like that. And yeah, I just kept doing that, and I still do it, I need to do more of it at this point.

Trinity Nguyen:

I've never tried this and I really want to as I keep listening to you, Kevin. So when you say visualizing the end, is it literally like seeing everything happening, like watching a movie?

Kevin Bailey:

Yeah. But you're there, so you don't feel like you're watching. So, I mean, I'll try to do a training on visualization then, I'll try and give you the real highlights. You have to incept the visualization, so what I like to do is called 5, 4, 3, 2, 1. So the way you incept a visualization to get the unconscious mind to buy in that it's happening, is you have to use your five senses. So 5, 3, 2, 1 would be like... All right, you close your eyes, what are five things I'm seeing? So, closing a deal, "Okay, I'm seeing the decision maker at Intel, he's just smiling, I see the Zoom screen, I'm seeing my dog come up et cetera. Then four things I'm hearing him say, we're in. Three things I'm feeling, I'm feeling excited, elated, whatever, two things, I'm smelling, victory, whatever, smelling the candle on the table. And then one thing I'm tasting is, I might take a sip of my water in my mind".

Kevin Bailey:

And at that point, then you go with the visualization and you're there and you can feel it out and play it out. So check this out, you want to talk about visualization, not to get super geeky on this, but remember Cool Runnings, the Jamaican Bob Sled team, they did end up winning Bob sled. A majority of their training was done mentally, they didn't have a Bob Sled track. So, they actually trained mentally, used visualization to rehearse that over and over again, until their bodies could do it without being on a track and ended up winning the Olympics. So the power of visualization is... Drew Brees, he spends as much time visualizing as he does actually physically practicing, 45 minutes a day. Maybe it's not as much as he spends physically practicing, but 45 minutes a day, that's his visualization practice. That's intense.

Trinity Nguyen:

That's incredible. Jamie, when you joined Dreamfuel, did you already practice some of these techniques before?

Jamie Sewell:

Well, I used some of the techniques before I went through Dreamfuel's program, but actually the thing I liked probably the most... Well, there are two things I like probably the most about the program, and the first was actually the accountability. And the second one was actually the framework, because you read all of these things, meditate, visualize, journal, exercise, do all of these techniques and it's going to radically transform your life and be like, "Okay, cool". But to Kevin's point earlier, a lot of it comes down to consistency, and then understanding where to pull in different tools. And so I think that's one of the things that makes Dreamfuel so special, is that we work with such busy professionals.

Jamie Sewell:

They don't have all this time to experiment with all these things on their own, and so what we've really done is distilled the program down into an actionable framework that they can apply in 15 minutes every single day, and see significant results in just one quarter. So that's really the magic, I think, in the program. So, I did some of these things on my own, and then throughout the program really got to refine and hone my own techniques, and then learned so much more. 52 different techniques that we train on, so it's a lot, it's just about putting tools in people's toolbox that they can pull out for different situations and make their own.

Trinity Nguyen:

15 minutes, that's great. That's not... When people hear these things, they're like... They got to be committing to something massive.

Kevin Bailey:

There's a lot of risk in doing this stuff too, because if you do it wrong, it can be pointless. Meaning emotion is what creates neuroplasticity, the only point of doing visualization is to create neuroplasticity. So if you're not generating emotion in visualization, you could do it over and over again and have absolutely no benefit from it if you don't understand that little piece of neuroscience. So it's not like working on the gym where you can be like, "Okay, I'm pushing 10 more pounds on this bench press". There's no tape measure for the mind, again the reason we were trying to track it, but you have to know how this stuff works if you want to do it quickly and it to be effective.

Christian Kletzl:

Sounds like SaaS onboarding to me.

Kevin Bailey:

Yeah, good point.

Trinity Nguyen:

So we talk about visualization, there must be other mental performance practices and techniques as well. Because I'm thinking of... I don't know if you heard of anyone having the condition called Aphantasia, there's 1% or 2% of the world that have this and they don't even know they have it, where they can't visualize. When they close their eyes they don't see what we are talking about. So how can they do these techniques?

Kevin Bailey:

So you can still do visualization with other senses, so you can close your eyes and just imagine without seeing Christian, celebrating some sort of victory. You just hear Christian in your mind going, "We did it, we hit it, we got it, let's go". And you're like, "Yeah let's go". You can hear the glasses clink, you don't have to see it, you can use the auditory sense to pull a visualization out too.

Christian Kletzl:

I am one of these 1% and I'm not totally sure I can do this.

Kevin Bailey:

You don't have a voice in your head?

Christian Kletzl:

No.

Trinity Nguyen:

He might have 0-1-1-0-0.

Kevin Bailey:

You don't just have the visual cortex not active, you can't hear as well? Any senses, can you smell in your mind?

Christian Kletzl:

No, what? People can smell in their mind? That's weird.

Kevin Bailey:

Like I could smell a rose right now.

Trinity Nguyen:

Christian is a special case.

Kevin Bailey:

I've met people who can't do the visual, but I've never met somebody who all senses are inactive. There's plenty other mental performance tools you can use besides visualization, we've stuck on visualization because it's a hot topic, but that's one of 50 things.

Christian Kletzl:

Meditation still works, you can still focus on stuff, how to feel your own body.

Kevin Bailey:

Frankly, if I'm you, Christian, and I'm trying to use visualization, I would do it by journaling. So as if journaling is a great tool for visualization, that doesn't use any internal senses, but it still tricks the subconscious mind into thinking something happens. So you take a journal, open it up, and then just date it in the future. So you could date it at the end of the day. You could be like, "Ah, six 23, 8:00 PM", and just journal, you're writing a journal entry about how a certain meeting went, or how your day went. That was actually the tool I used before sales calls, I didn't do closed eyes visualization. I would often journal about the meeting and how it went like it was the end of the day and I was just doing a daily review. So that's a great tool if you really don't have any internal sensory input.

Christian Kletzl:

I'll try that out, I think we're going a little bit too deep here just because of me.

Trinity Nguyen:

I think at some point Christian asked me, "When people talk about counting sheep to fall asleep, do they actually see sheep?" And I'm like, "Yeah, they do. I can see it in my head right now, jumping over a fence", and he's like, "What? Who does that?". So, that's when he realized that there's this thing called Aphantasia.

Kevin Bailey:

Very fascinating, I've certainly heard of it. And like I said, I've met people who had the visual stuff shut down, but I haven't met somebody who had all the senses.

Trinity Nguyen:

So I know that we are at the bottom of the hour, but do you have any other final words or advice for revenue practitioners out there, where they want to improve their performance, but might not have access to Dreamfuel yet?

Kevin Bailey:

So I think really important for the first 100 days, it really comes down to belief. You have to believe you can do it, so visualization is a way of cultivating belief. If you don't believe you're going to do it, I mean, I think it's a really overused Henry Ford quote, "If you think you can, or you think you can't, you're right". So during a first 100 days, when you're getting a revenue team going and it's total confusion, and you're experimenting and you have nowhere to point, that's where you have to cultivate belief. And so you do your best and believe in each other, and do your best in believing in the mission, and look around for inspiration wherever you can find it. Celebrate the small wins, dopamine is the neurotransmitter, neuromodulator of motivation. So you got to cultivate dopamine wherever you can find it.

Kevin Bailey:

So look for the little micro wins, celebrate with your team, an experiment went in the right direction, great, let's talk about that, let's get excited about it, because that's what gives you the dopamine to do the next thing. So adrenaline is the hormone of... Obviously energy and effort. You can only run adrenaline so long without Dopamine, before it triggers a quit response in you. So if you're in that mode, look for little ways to recognize yourself, recognize each other, show gratitude, to get you through this point, and that's what we're having to do right now.

Trinity Nguyen:

That's amazing, and I think that's so timely, end of quarter, also the world's on fire, well seems to be on fire, everyone's running around. So I think this is a great reminder for everyone out there to celebrate the small wins, because I feel like everyone saying, "Show gratitude every day", it seems a little bit fluffy, but the way that you explain it, how it works in our body, I think that makes sense. It makes the most sense so far for me.

Kevin Bailey:

Gratitude's great too. I mean yin to yang, I mean, gratitude runs serotonin, serotonin is a happiness molecule, you need serotonin. Dopamine though is triggered from celebration, of recognition, little hits a dopamine... and by the way, noradrenaline, which is euphoric effort hormone, sister of adrenaline, is derived from the dopamine molecule. So when you celebrate the win, it creates dopamine. And then that dopamine gets converted into noradrenaline, which is what gives you the effort to do the next thing.

Trinity Nguyen:

I love this explanation, how come all the cute posters talking about, "Show gratitude every day", they should have fine text to explain this, and I would have bought in this much longer. This makes so much more sense.

Kevin Bailey:

People call this stuff, "Woo woo", and whatever, and it's not, it's not, "Woo woo" at all. This is the operating manual for humans, if you understand how this stuff works, you understand how to win, it's simple. But you keep calling it, "Woo woo", and trying to put it off, you're just not reading the operators manual. Neuroscience hasn't always been around at this level, it's beautiful now, it's all out there, you just got to learn it.

Jamie Sewell:

One of the things that popped out for me in the program with Kevin is, he said, "Everybody learns how to drive a car, but nobody actually gets taught how to drive their mindset". And it's so true, we just operate habitually, whatever that status quo is becomes our status quo, but it doesn't have to be.

Kevin Bailey:

Free will is a spectrum, it's a spectrum. Normally we're driven by our compulsions, so mindset is stepping into the driver's seat and actually taking control of the vehicle.

Trinity Nguyen:

Now I can see why Dreamfuel is just word of mouth, you guys grew through word of mouth, because I'm sold. Where do I sign up? How can I sign up my entire team, we need this right now. Please do, here's my cell phone number, I'm not even kidding. Thanks Christian, can you improve the budget too?

Kevin Bailey:

We love what you guys are doing, and like I said, the first 100 days, we are experiencing it right now, even as mindset practitioners, it is not for the faint of heart. So thanks for what you guys are doing, putting together this podcast, and thank you for inviting us.

Trinity Nguyen:

Thank you for coming too, and sharing your tips and practice and everything, it's incredible. Now I have to rethink the whole process. Thanks for joining us on this episode of The First 100 Days. Be sure to hit that follow button as we get more revenue teams to share their stories.